Meet Jack Pope, Marketer Turned Web Developer

on Friday, April 1 @ 4:33pm

meet-jack-pope

We had the chance to catch up with Rails Web Development alum Jack Pope, on what life has been like post-Bloc. Originally from Connecticut, Pope recently moved to New York after accepting a job as a web developer at Tsu, a social media company.

Before enrolling in Bloc, Jack was a photographer and internet marketer. As he got involved with the more technical aspects of his job as a marketer, Jack’s interest in web development was piqued. Although he had some experience with HTML and CSS, he found himself wanting more.

Determined to learn, Jack looked into on-site coding bootcamps in his area. While applying, he kept running into the same dilemma: the upcoming cohorts weren’t starting for another 4-5 months. He refused to wait that long; his mind was set, and he wanted to start programming immediately.

Jack found Bloc, an online alternative to the on-premise programming schools that allowed him to start almost immediately. According to Jack, “Bloc’s just way more practical.” He gave his 2-week notice, and started his course at Bloc.

After completing Bloc’s 12-week Rails Web Development course, he started freelancing and adding projects to his Bloc-built portfolio. “I definitely learned a lot at Bloc and it was a great foundation, but the extra time to work on real projects after Bloc was really important.” Equipped with Bloc’s 12-week course and eight additional months of freelance work, Jack was ready to get a web developer job. He started his job hunt in September, and accepted his offer at Tsu in December.

For Jack, the job hunt was tough but crucial for learning. As expected, there were many rejections before he found the job he wanted. When asked about what he learned from his job search post-Bloc, Jack said, “The interviews you go in for and get rejected from are still really useful. I wouldn’t have passed the interview for this job had it not been for the previous interviews I went through. In each interview, I picked up a different skill and learned how to answer questions in a better way. Even the ones you end up not wanting or getting rejected from are worth having because they’ll help you prepare for the right interview and right job.”

So, what’s Jack up to now? As a Connecticut transplant in New York, Jack is busy working at Tsu, eating all of New York’s delicious food, and exploring the city he now calls home.

If you are looking for a similar career change, check out our Software Engineering Track.

Sign up for one of our upcoming online info sessions to learn more.

More advice on changing careers

Impostor Syndrome for n00bs

New coders, does this sound familiar? You’re finally getting the hang of programming. But then you overhear a conversation about a language you’ve never even heard of. Oh no! How could you call yourself a programmer if you’ve never even heard of Haskell? (How many programming languages are there?)

Easy, tiger. Impostor Syndrome is setting in hard. You feel like a fraud, even though your accomplishments show otherwise. Maybe you have successfully coded your first app but you feel like you’re pulling one over on the world by calling yourself a programmer. Or perhaps you enjoyed dabbling in Codecademy, but you could never actually make the switch to becoming a developer. Feeling this way is not only normal, it could actually be a signal of greatness.

Learning to program lends itself tragically well to Impostor Syndrome. There is so much to learn about programming, it’s impossible to be proficient in every aspect. Do you know how many people know everything there is to know about Ruby? Zero. Not a CS grad, not your smartest developer friend, not even the guy who created Ruby in the first place.

Rest easy, you’re not alone. No matter how experienced you are, you will always hear other developers talking about a new concept that you have never heard of. You may feel like you don’t belong in the conversation, but you do. Frame it as an opportunity to learn and become a better developer, and remember, everyone feels this way.

I can’t think of a group more prone to feeling this way than bootcamp students. The beauty of programming bootcamps is that they allow people with little to no programming experience enter and succeed in the field. Thus, if you called yourself a developer before you enrolled, you really would be an impostor.

At the most recent Bloc Career Talk, Bloc students shared their experiences with impostor syndrome. Hillary, a student in the Rails course, shares her experience:

I started as a technical analyst at a company that created a proprietary application that worked alongside SharePoint. For the first few months I imagined myself getting fired daily. Six months after starting I was promoted, and three months after that I was promoted again to a managerial position.

Hillary says she’s feeling impostor syndrome all over again as she sets out to land her first developer position, despite crushing her course and having four completed projects under her belt (way to go, Hillary!).

Okay, so there’s a name for this rotten feeling. Now what? As with many struggles, your first step is to recognize the issue. It’s only overwhelming and soul-crushing if you believe you’re the outsider. Think you really are the only person that feels this way? Try voicing your misgivings about your developer skills to a community of developers—I’d bet a lot of 1’s and 0’s that you’ll hear many others feel the same.

Once you realize that it’s a common struggle among beginners in any subject, the problem shifts from an internal judgment of yourself (“I’m just not a programmer”) to an opportunity to expand your skillset (“I have a lot that I can continue to learn”). The key to persisting through this forest of self-doubt, hopelessness, and anxiety is to accept what you don’t know, and challenge yourself to master it.

Then you can focus on progressing in your work to prove to yourself that you’re no impostor. If you’re facing an overwhelming problem, which is likely what led to all those “impostory” feelings in the first place, break it into tiny steps. Whether this is fixing a bug, writing an app, or getting to the end of your foundations, it will feel more manageable if you break the problem into pieces and celebrate the small wins.

At Bloc, students can connect and commiserate with fellow students on this topic and others in our Student Slack Community. During our Career Talks, students also get to fire their burning career switch questions at our captive Director of Student Outcomes, Courtland Alves.

This blog post is based on the recently hosted Bloc Career Talk covering Impostor Syndrome. Career Talks are bi-weekly seminars that facilitate discussion among Bloc students about the career search process.

Note: I struggled the entire way while writing this. Who am I to think I’m a writer? #impostorsyndrome

Impostor Syndrome for n00bs
Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: Coding Bootcamps and the Authenticity of Placement Rates

Authenticity

We’ve never formalized our core values at Bloc, but if you surveyed our employees you would probably see authenticity in the top three most cited responses — followed closely by swag and Batman. We’ll focus on authenticity today.

Authenticity is a word that we use very specifically, and we don’t use it to mean the same thing as honesty or transparency. The easiest way I’ve found to articulate the difference is to explain it in the context of someone asking a question:

  • Honesty is truthfully answering the question someone asked.
  • Authenticity is truthfully answering the question someone intended to ask.
  • Transparency is a bulk CSV export of your data.

Here’s an example: when we raised our Series A investment last year, a few of my friends asked me if I was now a millionaire.

An honest answer would be yes. On paper, if we had hypothetically raised a round with a post-money valuation over $5M and I owned at least 20% of the company I would have 20% x $5M = $1M ownership in a privately valued company and could technically be considered a millionaire.

The authentic answer would be no, not even close. The question my friends intended to ask was “do you have a million dollars of liquid cash that you can spend to buy me a Tesla Model S?” And the answer to that question is decidedly “no”, unless Elon would accept Bloc equity as cash.

... And Statistics

The developer bootcamp industry has an obsession with something called “the placement rate number.” It’s meant to measure a program’s efficacy by quantifying the percentage of graduates who successfully start careers as developers.

Bloc is one of few programs that has never advertised a placement rate. Prospective students are eager to ask us for this statistic, and I don’t necessarily blame them given how appealing it is to use a simple benchmark to compare programs. We don’t publish a placement rate though, as we believe it would potentially conflict with our commitment to authenticity, not because we lack confidence in the efficacy of our program.

When a prospective student asks us “what is your placement rate?” we could honestly say anywhere between 0-100% depending on how we qualify our answer. We could, today, say that 99% of our students find jobs after they graduate from Bloc in a way that is both technically honest and legally defensible, but not authentic or ethical. It’s not very difficult to game that statistic.

splorks

99% of our “splorkdents” find “globs” within 90 days of “schmanuating”. – Credit: SMBC Comics.

The truly authentic answer has nothing to do with statistics though. The question our students intend to ask is closer to “Does your program work?” or more specifically “Will your program work for me?” We’ve found a better way to answer that question: our Software Engineering Track comes with a tuition reimbursement policy for students who are unable to find new careers in software development after graduating, and now our students don’t have to worry about landing on the wrong side of a program’s 90% placement rate.

When there are programs with less than 20 grads touting a 100% placement rate and dozens of hidden qualifications, that number devolves from a transparent industry benchmark to a disingenuous marketing prop. While we look for authentic and quantifiable ways to evaluate program quality, I’ll encourage students to dig deeper: ask about the curriculum, background and experience of instructors, tuition and opportunity costs, and the hidden qualifications of these placement rate numbers.

Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: Coding Bootcamps and the Authenticity of Placement Rates