Why Apprenticeships Are on the Rise

on Tuesday, April 12 @ 8:05pm

Ask any VP of Engineering or CTO, and they’ll tell you hiring talented developers is getting harder. Meanwhile, ask one of the millions of underemployed millennials, and they’ll say they are willing to learn, but can’t get their foot in the door. Apprenticeship was once a commonplace feature of the American economy, but for the last 30 years it has been in decline. Apprenticeships are the critical link to closing the skills gap for employers and reducing unemployment for millennials.

To understand why apprenticeships can bridge the gap, let’s take a look at the marketplace for technical talent.

Traditional Universities are Failing Us

traditional-uni

First, the gap between supply and demand for technical talent is widening. On the supply side of the marketplace for technical talent, we have universities. According to the Department of Labor, 400,000 new CS grads will enter the workforce between 2010 and 2020. In that same period, nearly 1.4 million new tech jobs will be created. That’s a shortage – a skills gap of – 1 million more jobs than graduates.

Second, even those students graduating in computer science, aren’t prepared for careers in software engineering. Universities care about helping students become job-ready. But that isn’t their singular goal. Many also seek to teach a liberal arts education and to publish ground-breaking research. Because of this, there is no singular focus on one goal. As a result, students graduate ill-prepared for industry. According to Brad Neese, director of Apprenticeship Carolina, employers are seeing “a real lack of applicability in terms of skill level” from college graduates.

For example, top tier university computer science curricula often include courses in advanced math, physics, compilers, and operating systems. When we surveyed engineers at top companies like Twitter, Facebook, Google, and Amazon, they told us they used less than 25% of their university education in their career. According to Rob Gonzales, co-founder of Salsify, “many ‘core’ CS courses really aren’t that critical for becoming very productive engineers. I’ve never had to write a compiler or operating system in my career, and the last time I thought about finite automata was 2001 when I was studying them myself.”

Meanwhile, few universities teach essential skills a software engineer will use every day. According to Mo Kudeki, a Software Engineer at Twitter, “Although I went to a top Computer Science program, there are software engineering topics that we never covered that are crucial to being a great engineer, like how to methodically debug something, and how to give and receive a good code review.”

All of these factors combined result in a tremendous mismatch between the skills with which American students graduate and the skills needed by employers.

Employers are Hungry But Ill-Equipped to Train

chalkboard

While employers are hungry to recruit great talent, their appetite for growing that talent themselves has been declining for the past decade. According to Lauren Weber of the WSJ, apprenticeships in the US have declined over 30% from 2003 to 2013.

Furthermore, even those companies that want to provision such training may be unable to do so. Training programs require experienced instructors. According to Gonzales, “you must have someone to manage the program full time, including doing daily coaching, code reviews, design sessions, planning sessions, one-on-ones, communication outside of the group to gather requirements, etc. This person should be respected throughout the organization, as getting the program started and effective is going to be a bumpy road that will draw on company resources even beyond the coach.”

Unfortunately, the shortage of technical talent has left most companies without the bench strength to fill existing headcount and also train a large pool of junior developers. According to Marcy Capron, the founder and CEO of Chicago-based Polymathic: “Companies don’t have an infrastructure for ongoing learning. We really need a guide to mentoring junior devs. Hourly consulting firms can’t afford it because you can’t bill mentoring to the client.

We’re Seeing Renewed Investment and Innovation in Technical Skills Training

pair-programming

So with universities failing us, and employers hungry but unable to grow their own talent, a new breed of apprenticeship-like programs have leveraged technology to deliver better outcomes, more affordably than ever before. Computer science bootcamps put students through compressed programs to prepare them for coding jobs. These bootcamp programs have found traction with employers and graduates alike. The first coding bootcamp was founded just four years ago, but Course Report estimates that over 150 bootcamps graduated more than 16,000 alumni in 2015 – a combined estimated market of $180M, up from $0 in 2011.

According to Western Governors University President Bob Mendenhall in the Washington Post “Neither accreditation nor regulation has caught up with the power of technology to impact both the quality and cost and accessibility of higher education.” And last month, Udacity raised $105 Million bringing their valuation to $1 billion, Dev Bootcamp was acquired by Kaplan, and Bloc recently announced a year-long Software Engineering Track, which includes a three month apprenticeship, before students start the job search. And now a slew of specialized apprenticeship programs are emerging.

Employees are also more open to non-traditional university education than ever before. According to a 2014 survey by Glassdoor, 72 percent of employees said they value specialized training over earning a degree. What’s more, 63 percent of respondents said they believe that nontraditional ways of learning new skills — such as certificate programs, bootcamps, webinars and massive open online courses — could help them earn a bigger paycheck. This growth for nontraditional skills training may be coming at the expense of graduate programs, with more than half (53%) of employees saying a graduate degree is no longer necessary to be offered a high-paying job.

What Should We Expect to See in 2016?

As apprentice-like programs cross the chasm from early adopters to early majority, we may see see savvy millennials foregoing the traditional 4-year campus experience in favor of a leaner hybrid, pairing community college with a technical apprenticeship that gets them into the workforce and learning on the job earlier and with less debt.

With the hype around coding bootcamps reaching it’s zenith, we may see these programs coming full-circle, as they begin adding-back curriculum covering the computer science theory that they once eschewed.

More advice on changing careers

Should I Become a Software Engineer or a Junior Web Developer?

The software industry uses words like hacker, programmer, coder, developer, engineer, and architect to differentiate between similar-but-not-identical skill sets. These terms are poorly defined, which causes ambiguity, and their appropriate uses are still debated today:

Bloc offers two related Tracks for students who desire to learn these skills: a Full Stack Web Developer Track, and a Software Engineer Track. Since the definition of these terms can be ambiguous, let’s be explicit about what we mean. (Others may use these terms differently.)

fst-vs-set

If you graduate from the Full Stack Web Development Track, you’ll be able to develop and maintain web apps. You will learn two programming languages, how to create databases, advanced styling techniques, and more.

But there exists a class of problems not covered by this Track. As an example, consider this question: “Given a list of cities and the distances between each pair of cities, what is the shortest possible route that visits each city exactly once and returns to the origin city?” It’s called the Traveling Salesman Problem because a salesman must travel through many cities and make the best use of their time. There are many problems like this.

For example, Airbnb might want its users to create search queries like “Given a city and a list of Airbnb rentals, what is the cheapest way to rent Airbnbs for three straight months, using only Airbnbs that have a dishwasher, a washer/dryer, or both?” A junior web developer may not be prepared to write code to efficiently answer that question. A software engineer grad is armed with techniques and skills that make them capable of solving these open-ended and complex problems.

Here’s an analogy outside of software development: a Full Stack Web Development Track graduate is like a construction worker who builds bridges. Bridge-building is highly skilled labor, requiring lots of practice and knowledge of different materials, approaches, scenarios, and designs. A great bridge-builder can adapt their approach to different types of gaps, different weight requirements, etc. But ultimately this person is combining existing tools to construct something, not designing something new.

A Software Engineering Track graduate is like an architect or civil engineer. This person understands the theory behind everything – not just which metal to use where, but why: how to measure it and prove it. This person also understands at a more fundamental level how the sausage is made: what goes into the metal alloy, or how the specific curve of a support beam is important. They are uniquely qualified to design new bridges, and make more creative, iterative improvements on existing bridges.

The former will likely always be employable, at least in areas with bridges. But the latter is indispensable to society: without them, we can never evolve. Ultimately, graduates of the Software Engineering Track can solve harder problems, handle more complexity, and create more robust software.

Now that you know the difference, consider which track to enroll in.

Which Bloc Track Should I Choose?

Given your hard work and diligence, Bloc Tracks will change your career and your life. All Tracks teach professional-grade software development skills, include dedicated one-on-one mentorship from an industry expert, and come with exclusive access to Bloc’s Employer Network and Career Services team. Each Track follows the tried-and-true Bloc approach of building real software, starting with carefully sequenced and technically rigorous curriculum and transitioning to independent work at the end.

In the Full Stack Web Developer Track, you learn the critical skills for modern web development, including Ruby on Rails, JavaScript, HTML, and CSS. You practice these by creating a variety of web apps during your course. Graduates of this Track are qualified to work as junior web developers.

Here are the main differences:

fst-vs-set-chart

Compared to the Full Stack Track, the Software Engineering Track (SET) covers more advanced topics, and requires one thousand hours of additional work. Both are premium experiences designed to help you get a specific outcome: new skills and a new job. SET’s length provides its students with enough time to master the advanced skill set. Whichever direction you go, a Bloc Track will teach you to write outstanding software, improve your career, and enrich your life.

Should I Become a Software Engineer or a Junior Web Developer?
The Modern Computer Science Degree

Coding Bootcamps and Computer Science degrees are popular routes for students to launch careers in software development. Coding bootcamps average 12 weeks in length, and teach practical skills like building web applications from scratch. They prepare students for a job as an entry-level web developer, intern, or freelancer. Computer science programs average 4 years in length, and teach a wide range of concepts in programming, algorithms, advanced math, statistics, and general electives which may not correlate with computer science.

Coding bootcamps and computer science programs are the two most prevalent ways to start a career as a software professional. But coding bootcamps lack computer science fundamentals, and computer science programs often lack practical experience, and are extreme commitments in time and expense. The gap between what you learn in a coding bootcamp and computer science degree is why we created the Software Engineering Track.

software-engineering-job-critical-skills

Bloc’s Software Engineering Track teaches practical skills and combines them with advanced computer science topics and open-source software development. It teaches you everything you need to be a professional software engineer, and leaves out everything you don’t. We know this because we built the program after consulting with companies like Google, Facebook, and Twitter. After consulting with top engineering teams, we developed this chart to represent the programming learning curve:

Programming-Learning-Curve

We believe that 2,000 hours of focused study and practice are essential for becoming a software engineer. This chart shows where you’ll be after graduating from a coding bootcamp — which is between 500 and 1,000 hours — but it doesn’t explicitly illustrate why our Software Engineering Track is more effective than a computer science degree. Let’s explore four reasons why Bloc’s Software Engineering Track prepares you for a career in software engineering more effectively than a computer science degree.

For more information on why coding bootcamps often fall short, [read this blog we wrote about the topic](NEED URL).

cost-and-time

Time is a Feature, When It’s Focused

A computer science program is four years worth of full-time study. This roughly totals to 6,000 learning and study hours. Thousands of those hours are unlikely to directly help you once you get a job though. A computer science program forces you to take electives, and advanced classes on artificial intelligence, history of computing, and theory that are not easily translatable to working as a professional software engineer. It’s not that these are bad things to learn – they may provide some useful life lessons – but they are not essential for becoming a software engineer. Bloc’s program includes 2,000 hours of learning and study hours, and every single hour is meaningful in becoming a software engineer.

Spending one year learning everything you need is a better use of time than spending four years learning many things you don’t. There’s plenty of time to learn new things in life, but when you’re paying to learn, the topics should be directly related to the outcome.

Avoid Life-Altering Debt

Computer science programs range in cost based on factors like residency, school, and financial status. A four year degree can easily reach into the six figures. For this reason, many students are forced to take out loans with interest rates between 4% and 6%. This is life-altering debt that will likely take years to pay off.

Bloc’s Software Engineering Track is not cheap — $24,000 is significant amount of money — but with reasonable payment options this amount should not be life-altering. In fact, financing as low as $750/month is available, which allows you to pay for the course after getting a job. Also, Bloc offers a tuition reimbursement guarantee that if you are not able to find a job as a software engineer with a starting salary of at least $60,000, you’ll be refunded in full. No computer science program offers such a promise.

At $24,000, Bloc’s program is a fraction of the cost of many computer science programs, and offers a tuition reimbursement guarantee on top of that. Your investment in Bloc is much smaller than it would be in a computer science program, and also much safer due to the reimbursement policy.

Return on Investment

ROI is a financial acronym that stands for “return on investment”. It explains what you’ll earn as a result of an investment. Not only is Bloc’s program a fraction of the cost of a computer science degree, but it also employs you faster. After one year, you’ll start earning a full-time salary as a software engineer. The return on your investment of $24,000 will be greater proportionally to that of an investment in a computer science degree, and it will also come quicker. The ROI you realize from a smaller investment and earning at a faster pace can have exponentially positive results over decades. But most importantly, you’ll also start a career doing meaningful work. Software is eating the world because it solves real problems. As a software engineer, you’ll be able to positively impact other people’s lives through software, and the value and satisfaction you realize will be incalculable.

mastery

Path to Mastery

No matter how great a computer science program, coding bootcamp, or our Software Engineering Track is, it will always pale in comparison to the experience you have working as a professional. The lessons you learn in a classroom setting will never match what you learn when you’re on the job. The apprenticeship model – which we employ in the Software Engineering Track – is an improvement over the classroom, as it provides training and lessons in a practical setting, but even it doesn’t match the effectiveness of learning on the job.

To become a master at something, you have to practice a lot, and you have to practice in realistic settings. There is nothing more realistic than practicing your skills when you are being paid to do so. In this respect, you want to be careful not to spend too much time in a classroom.

The final phase in the Software Engineering Track is an Open-Source Apprenticeship, where you work on open-source software with other professional engineers. In addition to learning through practical work, you’ll build a remarkable resume of open-source contributions. After the Open-Source Apprenticeship, you’ll get a job solving real problems for a real company four times faster than you would with a computer science degree.

For more of our thoughts on learning and mastery, [read about mastering software engineering](NEED URL).

Time, Money, ROI, and Learning

We aren’t so extreme in our views that we think computer science degrees should be abolished. They do serve a purpose for aspiring robotics and machine learning engineers, and they do many things well in general. But we feel strongly that they can be improved, and the Software Engineering Track is what we built to prove that. In a shorter period of time, with less of an investment, a safer investment, a faster return on your investment, and more effective learning, you will have a better outcome with the Software Engineering Track, and you’ll start the path to mastery sooner than you would by enrolling in a computer science program.

If you want to learn more about Bloc’s Software Engineering program and how it prepares you to land a job developing software, join us at an online info session. We’ll dive into the curriculum, what it’s like to be a Bloc student, and details about our 100% tuition refund guarantee.

The Modern Computer Science Degree