Career Notes

Tips, advice, and guidance for changing your career.

What Companies Look for in Software Developers

Aaron Brager

on Tuesday, April 12 @ 8:22pm

Software developer positions are highly desired. Just as astronauts, Supreme Court justices, and Hogwarts professors must have a variety of skills and knowledge, software developers have a combination of technical knowledge and soft skills. This post explores the skills that many companies look for.

Familiarity With Multiple Languages

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How to Succeed in an Online Coding Program

Learning online is hard

As online education proliferates (read: online coding programs), its proponents and detractors develop increasingly stronger opinions on its effectiveness. Proponents tout online education’s low cost, accessibility, and flexibility. Students can learn anywhere, according to their schedule, and usually at a reduced expense. Detractors, on the other hand, cite high dropout rates and a lack of effectiveness. While both sides of this debate are correct, there is a strategy for succeeding in an online program.

Create a dedicated home office, and make it awesome

A dedicated home office doesn’t require a large investment. As an online student you’ll work from home most of the time. You must find a space that’s quiet, clean, and allows for ergonomic amenities. 100 square feet should be plenty of space to create an office. You can find high-quality office furniture at IKEA, or buy used from a site like craigslist. Consider using a standing desk, or treat yourself to an ergonomic desk chair. Better yet, you can buy a sitting desk and build a modular standing desk, so you can stand or sit.

After your desk and chair are positioned, build the rest of the office around them. Hang pictures or paintings and buy a small bookshelf to fill with inspirational books. Save your money for perhaps the most expensive things, like a computer and monitor. It’s essential that you have a capable computer, and I recommend splurging on a large monitor. You’ll need to have multiple windows open from time to time, and a large monitor provides the real estate to do this.

Finally, if you live with other people, ask them to respect your office space. A clean, organized, and comfortable office will set you on the right path for succeeding in an online program.

Immerse yourself

When you take an in-person program, immersion in the topic is inherent. You’re physically near your classmates which means that you’re likely to discuss the program and share knowledge. As an online student, immersion is not necessarily inherent – you have to force the issue. Your program will probably have a community – forums, chat rooms and mail lists – and while those are good places to hang out, you shouldn’t stop there. Subscribe to blogs and podcasts and find people to follow on Twitter. Get to know the lingo of your topic of study, and some of its key figures. It doesn’t matter if you understand everything right away, it’s important to become comfortable with the “language” you’re learning.

Study every day

In-person programs impose a routine of study because you have to go to class at specific times. Online programs offer more flexibility, so you have to manufacture a routine. Without a consistent and disciplined routine of study, you will not succeed in an online program. Whether you spend 15 minutes or 8 hours studying, you must study every single day. Create a habit for yourself. How long it takes to form a habit depends on the person, but you’ll know once you develop it because it will feel wrong not to study. Make sure that your study time is scheduled when you are at your mental best, and not when you’re tired or easily distracted. Find a method that helps you get into a relaxed zone, and make sure you schedule your study time around it.

Find meetups

The fact that you don’t have a classroom doesn’t mean you should avoid people and in-person interaction. An online program offers many benefits over an in-person program, but interaction in real life is something it can not offer. Fortunately, there are many options for meeting people in real life for many different areas of interest.

For example, if you’re studying to become a Rails web developer, there is almost certainly a Ruby or Rails meetup in your area. Join the meetup group, discuss your program with others, tell them what you’re working on and what you’re having trouble with. You’ll learn a lot from these experiences, and often in ways that are hard to duplicate virtually.

Rebase iteratively, and celebrate

No matter how great your virtual community is or how many meetups you attend, as an online student you’ll spend most of your time alone. It’s easy to forget how much you’ve learned when nobody is there to remind you. You must make it a habit to remind yourself. At the end of every day, you should rebase. That is, think about what you know, compared to the prior day. Think about the problem you’ve been toiling over, and that you finally solved. Even though these may seem like small wins, celebrate them! Treat yourself to a beer, order a pizza, or do something to spoil yourself for every little win.

Celebrating your wins is as important as embracing your struggles. If you focus too much on either, you’ll derail your progress. Develop a balanced mindset for both, and you’ll create momentum to capitalize on your wins, and grit to push you through struggles.

Will an online program work for you?

It certainly can, but whether it does or not ultimately depends on your commitment, consistency, and discipline. The strategy outlined in this blog will ensure that you succeed in your program, but you have to embrace every part. If you do, an online program will provide you with a quality education, at a reduced cost, and on your own schedule.

How to Succeed in an Online Coding Program
4 Computer Science Essentials to Land the Job

When starting a new career, you want to give yourself every advantage. If that career is in software development, then learning computer science fundamentals is that extra bit of oomph you bring to each interview. Most bootcamps eschew these fundamentals for more pragmatic skills. But as these bootcamp grads expand the talent pool, recruiters start to see a lot of the same credentials.

To help our students stand out, we’ve included Software Engineering Principles in our new CS-degree replacing program: the Software Engineering Track. We included the following topics after consulting with some of the best engineering companies in the world, including Twitter and Google. Read on to learn why these four skill-sets are critical to every software engineer.

Data Structures

The Data Structures section challenges students to build and apply hash maps, linked lists, stacks, queues, trees, and graphs. Interviewers test for knowledge of data structures because these constructs are the most commonly employed tools in software development. We dissect these structures to reveal how they work, and thus provide students the insight necessary to optimize their use.

data-structures

Some data structures perform better than others, and each applies to specific scenarios. Using the wrong data structure can hinder performance, and relying on an unsuitable data structure can lead to illegible code and wasted effort. In one example, students build two versions of a favorite film organizer, each powered by a different data structure. This project demonstrates how choosing the right structure improves performance and utility.

Algorithms & Complexity Analysis

Algorithms act upon data to sort, calculate, or otherwise manipulate information into a desired form. For example, given a set of 10,000 numbers, return the five smallest. We can devise infinite ways to perform this work, and each way represents a unique algorithm.

algorithms

Students study known algorithms as well as their complexity to understand the performance cost of each. Complexity analysis goes further to assess the value of any piece of code: both the number of operations required as well as memory consumed. This is a critical skill to have, chiefly for those students hired by firms that work with large data sets. The cost of a small oversight is minimal when operating on 12 pieces of data, but enormous with 12 million.

Databases

Databases provide the storage backbone for nearly all applications. Frameworks such as Rails help abstract the database from the developer with Object-Relational Mapping (ORM). While beneficial to the seasoned coder, these abstractions can hinder a beginner’s understanding of how modern software reads and writes persistent data.

During the Databases section of the Software Engineering phase, we instruct in the Structured Query Language, more commonly known as SQL. We use SQL to build an ORM by creating tables, inserting data, accessing rows, and performing other common framework operations. Students will also learn how to support object associations and protect their databases from malicious injections.

For companies like Facebook, their database structure is critical. Facebook users across the globe access millions of data elements every second; a poor query or mal-designed schema can translate to countless dollars lost every day.

Framework Architecture & Design Patterns

With a working understanding of Rails, data structures, algorithms, complexity, and databases, students will build a new framework. The Software Engineering phase requires this because it removes the last metaphoric road block that separates an amateur from a professional.

After completing this project, students are no longer mere users of a framework, they are its marshals. They understand how frameworks operate and need not assume how Rails brings their applications to life. This section empowers the idea that nothing is beyond a student’s understanding.

Comprehending framework design is critical, especially for employees at GitHub. GitHub once ran on a forked version of Rails which they modified to suit their product’s needs. Without the requisite knowledge, creating and maintaining a custom framework is extremely difficult.

At their core, Bloc’s Software Engineering Principles address the gaps of knowledge between a web developer and a software engineer. By dismissing the “magic” of software, students acknowledge that beneath every shortcut and library, more code exists. Students armed with this knowledge are more valuable to future employers, coworkers, and projects.

4 Computer Science Essentials to Land the Job
Meet Jack Pope, Marketer Turned Web Developer

meet-jack-pope

We had the chance to catch up with Rails Web Development alum Jack Pope, on what life has been like post-Bloc. Originally from Connecticut, Pope recently moved to New York after accepting a job as a web developer at Tsu, a social media company.

Before enrolling in Bloc, Jack was a photographer and internet marketer. As he got involved with the more technical aspects of his job as a marketer, Jack’s interest in web development was piqued. Although he had some experience with HTML and CSS, he found himself wanting more.

Determined to learn, Jack looked into on-site coding bootcamps in his area. While applying, he kept running into the same dilemma: the upcoming cohorts weren’t starting for another 4-5 months. He refused to wait that long; his mind was set, and he wanted to start programming immediately.

Jack found Bloc, an online alternative to the on-premise programming schools that allowed him to start almost immediately. According to Jack, “Bloc’s just way more practical.” He gave his 2-week notice, and started his course at Bloc.

After completing Bloc’s 12-week Rails Web Development course, he started freelancing and adding projects to his Bloc-built portfolio. “I definitely learned a lot at Bloc and it was a great foundation, but the extra time to work on real projects after Bloc was really important.” Equipped with Bloc’s 12-week course and eight additional months of freelance work, Jack was ready to get a web developer job. He started his job hunt in September, and accepted his offer at Tsu in December.

For Jack, the job hunt was tough but crucial for learning. As expected, there were many rejections before he found the job he wanted. When asked about what he learned from his job search post-Bloc, Jack said, “The interviews you go in for and get rejected from are still really useful. I wouldn’t have passed the interview for this job had it not been for the previous interviews I went through. In each interview, I picked up a different skill and learned how to answer questions in a better way. Even the ones you end up not wanting or getting rejected from are worth having because they’ll help you prepare for the right interview and right job.”

So, what’s Jack up to now? As a Connecticut transplant in New York, Jack is busy working at Tsu, eating all of New York’s delicious food, and exploring the city he now calls home.

If you are looking for a similar career change, check out our Software Engineering Track.

Sign up for one of our upcoming online info sessions to learn more.

Meet Jack Pope, Marketer Turned Web Developer
Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: Coding Bootcamps and the Authenticity of Placement Rates

Authenticity

We’ve never formalized our core values at Bloc, but if you surveyed our employees you would probably see authenticity in the top three most cited responses — followed closely by swag and Batman. We’ll focus on authenticity today.

Authenticity is a word that we use very specifically, and we don’t use it to mean the same thing as honesty or transparency. The easiest way I’ve found to articulate the difference is to explain it in the context of someone asking a question:

  • Honesty is truthfully answering the question someone asked.
  • Authenticity is truthfully answering the question someone intended to ask.
  • Transparency is a bulk CSV export of your data.

Here’s an example: when we raised our Series A investment last year, a few of my friends asked me if I was now a millionaire.

An honest answer would be yes. On paper, if we had hypothetically raised a round with a post-money valuation over $5M and I owned at least 20% of the company I would have 20% x $5M = $1M ownership in a privately valued company and could technically be considered a millionaire.

The authentic answer would be no, not even close. The question my friends intended to ask was “do you have a million dollars of liquid cash that you can spend to buy me a Tesla Model S?” And the answer to that question is decidedly “no”, unless Elon would accept Bloc equity as cash.

... And Statistics

The developer bootcamp industry has an obsession with something called “the placement rate number.” It’s meant to measure a program’s efficacy by quantifying the percentage of graduates who successfully start careers as developers.

Bloc is one of few programs that has never advertised a placement rate. Prospective students are eager to ask us for this statistic, and I don’t necessarily blame them given how appealing it is to use a simple benchmark to compare programs. We don’t publish a placement rate though, as we believe it would potentially conflict with our commitment to authenticity, not because we lack confidence in the efficacy of our program.

When a prospective student asks us “what is your placement rate?” we could honestly say anywhere between 0-100% depending on how we qualify our answer. We could, today, say that 99% of our students find jobs after they graduate from Bloc in a way that is both technically honest and legally defensible, but not authentic or ethical. It’s not very difficult to game that statistic.

splorks

99% of our “splorkdents” find “globs” within 90 days of “schmanuating”. – Credit: SMBC Comics.

The truly authentic answer has nothing to do with statistics though. The question our students intend to ask is closer to “Does your program work?” or more specifically “Will your program work for me?” We’ve found a better way to answer that question: our Software Engineering Track comes with a tuition reimbursement policy for students who are unable to find new careers in software development after graduating, and now our students don’t have to worry about landing on the wrong side of a program’s 90% placement rate.

When there are programs with less than 20 grads touting a 100% placement rate and dozens of hidden qualifications, that number devolves from a transparent industry benchmark to a disingenuous marketing prop. While we look for authentic and quantifiable ways to evaluate program quality, I’ll encourage students to dig deeper: ask about the curriculum, background and experience of instructors, tuition and opportunity costs, and the hidden qualifications of these placement rate numbers.

Lies, Damned Lies, and Statistics: Coding Bootcamps and the Authenticity of Placement Rates